The concept of contagion in microbiology

The concept

Concept of contagion: Long before microbes had been seen, observations on communicable diseases had given rise to the concept of contagion: the spread of disease by contact, direct or indirect. This idea was implicit in the concept laws enacted in early biblical times to prevent the spread of leprosy. 
Invisible living creatures produced disease: Varro in the 2nd century BC later recorded the principle of contagion by invisible creatures. 

Roger Bacon, in the 13th century, more than a millennium later, postulated that invisible living creatures produced disease. Fracastorius (1546), a physician of Verona, concluded that communicable diseases were caused by living agents (germs) "seminaria" or "seeds". Kircher (1659) reported finding minute worms in the blood of plague victims, but with the equipment available to him, it is more likely that what he observed were only blood cells.
Roger Bacon, in the 13th century, more than a millennium later, postulated that invisible living creatures produced disease. Fracastorius (1546), a physician of Verona, concluded that communicable diseases were caused by living agents (germs) "seminaria" or "seeds". Kircher (1659) reported finding minute worms in the blood of plague victims, but with the equipment available to him, it is more likely that what he observed were only blood cells.


Microbiology is the concept study of living organisms of microscopic size. Medical microbiology is the subdivision concerned with the causative agents of infectious disease of man, the response of the host to infection and various methods of diagnosis, treatment and prevention concept.

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